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Thread: Should insurance/DVLA be informed? Maybe one for Dan this?

  
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    Kev.'s Avatar
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    Should insurance/DVLA be informed? Maybe one for Dan this?

    On behalf of the g/f...

    The g/f is, i dunno if it'd be classed as 'partially' but i'll use the word anyway, she's partially sighted in her right eye.

    Due to being born after 24 or 26 (can't remember which) weeks, luckily the only part of her that wasn't really fully developed was her right eye. As a result, she can't see out of it properly. She can make out shapes & shadows & such, but sometimes she'll be caught off guard (not often, but it happens). You can't fool her with the "how many fingers" trick either due to a lot of work being put in in the early years to strengthen the eye.
    As an aside, it means her 'good' eye is pretty supersonic!! lol.

    Anyway, i don't think she told them when she was learning & what not. My mum says she has to inform the DVLA about her arthiritis/sciatica (can't remember which, maybe both). So i just wondered about the g/f & her eye.

    If she has to inform someone, will it be a case of an insurance bump up, or is there more to it than that?

    and final question ......... if she doesn't inform anyone.......?

    Cheers

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    demogorgon's Avatar
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    hey buddy, sorry to her about the gf's probs... but I bet she don't let em get her down.
    right to your question:
    her eye - it depends on the classification of the visual difficulties. if it is registered as (DVLA wording) "disorders producing field defect including partial or complete homonymous hemianopia/quadrantanopia or complete bitemporal hemianopia, retinitis pigmentosa, bilateral glaucoma, bilateral retinopathy" driving must stop unless she can meet the national guidelines for field of vision testing.

    Waffle clear up time:
    homonymous hemianopia - partial blindness affecting both eyes, ie. left sided vision loss in both eyes
    homonymous quadrantanopia - same as above, but affects top or bottom field of vision
    bitemporal hemianopia - vision loss to left and right fields of vision in both eyes, ie.
    left eye:left sided vision loss
    right eye:right sided vision loss
    = can only see things directly infront
    retinitis pigmentosa - tunnel vision
    bilateral retinopathy - damage to the retina of both eyes (not caused by inflammation), most common cause is the blood supply to the eye

    Going by them (and what u've said) she has none of the above. The only problem is when it comes to MONOCULAR VISION, which is where someone has lost the sight in one eye. They could be difficult with this one (only if they change their guidelines that is), but as it stands any form of light perception in the affected eye is not classified as the above problem..... so she's sorted (ATM).

    Arthritis only has to be registered if severe under Permanent Limb Disabilities/Spinal Disabilities.

    Sciatica is never mentioned in the guidelines, so no hassles there.


    As for the insurance side.... well technically the conditions affecting here eye do not have to be disclosed to the DVLA, therefore no impositions or insurance bump up's should be enforced, but I would inform them (just to cover your own back) incase something did happen, then they could reduce liability/payout due to not being informed.

    Hope I've been of some help
    Men have two emotions: Hungry and Horny. If you see him without an erection, make him a sandwich

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    Thanks for taking the time to reply there mate

    She can see shapes & what have you out of the poor eye & her instructor told her she should just double check on manoeuvers etc. So thanks for the info on that.

    Don't know who, but someone told the mother she has to inform the DVLA with her arthiritis, so she'll be doing that, although she's left it a good while.

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    no probs. just be on the safe side and mention them... i've seen the insurance blow out following things like that, not to mention the law's stance on drivers (everyone is judged as an "ordinary" driver who holds a licence, which does include provisional drivers... harsh but true).
    Men have two emotions: Hungry and Horny. If you see him without an erection, make him a sandwich

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    DAN@ADRIAN FLUX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev_83 View Post
    On behalf of the g/f...

    The g/f is, i dunno if it'd be classed as 'partially' but i'll use the word anyway, she's partially sighted in her right eye.

    Due to being born after 24 or 26 (can't remember which) weeks, luckily the only part of her that wasn't really fully developed was her right eye. As a result, she can't see out of it properly. She can make out shapes & shadows & such, but sometimes she'll be caught off guard (not often, but it happens). You can't fool her with the "how many fingers" trick either due to a lot of work being put in in the early years to strengthen the eye.
    As an aside, it means her 'good' eye is pretty supersonic!! lol.

    Anyway, i don't think she told them when she was learning & what not. My mum says she has to inform the DVLA about her arthiritis/sciatica (can't remember which, maybe both). So i just wondered about the g/f & her eye.

    If she has to inform someone, will it be a case of an insurance bump up, or is there more to it than that?

    and final question ......... if she doesn't inform anyone.......?

    Cheers

    I'd definately let the DVLA/Insurance company know just to be on the safe side mate. It would be awful if your partner's insurance didnt pay out in the event of a claim.
    Dan

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